Supplemental Material: “Safe People”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: Safe People: How to Find Relationships that are Good for you and Avoid those that Aren’t by Dr. Henry Cloud and Dr. John Townsend

Type of Material: Self-help Book for teens to adults

How to Access it: Safe People: How to Find Relationships that are Good for you and Avoid those that Aren’t is available for purchase on Amazon and numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for hard or audio copies of this material.

Publisher’s Book Synopsis: “Too many of us have invested ourselves into relationships where things have gone wrong. You may have experienced being judged, manipulated controlled, or worse. The impact of being with an unsafe person can be damaging to your confidence, your trust in others, and even your health. And what’s more, we either repeat the same mistakes of judgment over and over, or else simply give up on trying to have great, authentic relationships again. We get busy instead. Why do we choose the wrong people to get involved with? Is it possible to change? And if so, where does one begin? Drs. Henry Cloud and John Townsend offer solid guidance for making safe choices in relationships, from family to friendship, romance and work. They help identify the healthy and growing people we all need in our lives, as well as ones we need to learn to avoid. Safe People will help you to recognize twenty traits of relationally untrustworthy people and discover what makes some people relationally safe, as well as how to avoid unhealthy entanglements. You’ll learn about things within yourself that jeopardize your relational security, and you’ll find out how to develop a balanced approach to relationships.”

How I learned about this material: This book was mentioned numerous times throughout my Masters program as material frequently referred to with clients.

Why I suggest this material: Building strong, supportive relationships makes a huge impact on my clients during their journey through therapy but having that kind of relationship isn’t a given. I have personally been impacted by this material and believe it reveals a lot of truths about who is safe and who is not.

Who may benefit: Anyone who is relationship with another person. Seriously, anyone.

 

 

Supplemental Material: “Braving the Wilderness”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: Braving the Wilderness by Brene Brown

Type of Material: Self-Help Book

How to Access it: Braving the Wilderness is available for purchase on Amazon and numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for any of my resources.

From Brene’s Website: “True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness in both being a part of something, and standing alone when necessary. But in a culture that’s rife with perfectionism and pleasing, and with the erosion of civility, it’s easy to stay quiet, hide in our ideological bunkers, or fit in rather than show up as our true selves and brave the wilderness of uncertainty and criticism. The wilderness is an untamed, unpredictable place of solitude and searching. It is a place as dangerous as it is breathtaking, a place as sought after as it is feared. But it turns out to be the place of true belonging, and it’s the bravest and most sacred place you will ever stand.”

How I learned about this material: Brene Brown’s work has been incredibly impactful in my personal life. Her work is authentic, direct, and real in a beautiful way. I strongly suggest all of her written material to clients, family, and friends.

Why I suggest this material: I believe very confidently that we are social creatures, created to live life in meaningful connection. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy to do. Braving the Wilderness outlines four personal practices of belonging that push the boundaries of what we’ve been taught through our families, social structures, and culture. True belonging asks us to be vulnerable, take risk, and be brave. I suggest this material because she communicates the how and the struggle in a way that encourages readers to step into the unknown with hope.

Who may benefit: Those who feel that their relationships lack a sense of safety and authenticity; those who would like to be apart without sacrificing who they are and pretending to be someone they are not.

 

 

Supplemental Material: “Trauma is Really Strange”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: Trauma is Really Strange by Steve Haines, illustrated by Sophie Standing

Type of Material: Graphic book for children through adults.

How to Access it: Trauma is Really Strange is available for purchase on Amazon and numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for any of my resources.

Publisher’s Book Synopsis: “What is trauma? How does it change the way our brains work? And how can we overcome it? When something traumatic happens to us, we dissociate and our bodies shut down their normal processes. This unique comic explains the strange nature of trauma and how it confuses the brain and affects the body. With wonderful artwork, cat and mouse metaphors, essential scientific facts, and a healthy dose of wit, the narrator reveals how trauma resolution involves changing the body’s physiology and describes techniques that can achieve this, including Trauma Releasing Exercises that allow the body to shake away tension, safely releasing deep muscular patterns of stress and trauma.”

How I learned about this material: This resource came to my attention during a session on trauma during the American Counseling Association of Missouri’s annual conference. The author and illustrator have completed two other books together: Pain is Really Strange and Anxiety is Really Strange. There is another similar resource illustrated by Sophie Standing: Forgiveness is Really Strange, written by Masi Noor and Mariana Cantacuzino.

Why I suggest this material: In my personal life and with clients, I’ve found that understanding the chemical and physical impact that trauma has on our emotions and thinking is vital to creating change in our own lives. I suggest this material to anyone who continues to hit a wall in their therapy. Having the information often times allows clients to take back control over their therapeutic journey.

Who may benefit: Anyone who has experienced trauma or knows someone who has experienced trauma can benefit from this resource. This book is also written in comic style, so the material is interesting to children as there are visual representations of the written material.

 

 

Supplemental Material: “In My Heart”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: In My Heart by Jo Witkek, illustrated by Christine Roussey

Type of Material: Children’s Book

How to Access it: In My Heart is available to purchase on Amazon and numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for any of my resources.

Publisher’s Book Synopsis: “Happiness, sadness, bravery, anger, shyness . . . our hearts can feel so many feelings! Some make us feel as light as a balloon, others as heavy as an elephant. In My Heart explores a full range of emotions, describing how they feel physically, inside. With language that is lyrical but also direct, toddlers will be empowered by this new vocabulary and able to practice articulating and identifying their own emotions. With whimsical illustrations and an irresistible die-cut heart that extends through each spread, this unique feelings book is gorgeously packaged.”

How I learned about this material: I was preparing for the birth of my child by nearly daily meandering the aisles of Target making sure I had everything I ‘needed’ when I stumbled upon this book. As a consumer who often judges a book by the cover, I thought it was adorable, creative, and useful. My toddler and I read this almost daily.

Why I suggest this material: Research conducted on brain development helps us understand the importance of children learning how to express their emotions. As a parent, I fully acknowledge that this is a hard task. The part of our brain that is most successful in regulating our emotions does not fully develop until we are in our 20’s, so it’s a journey. Through this book we can give our children language, pictures, and experiences that help them communicate their inner landscape.

Who may benefit: Families with young children can use this resource to help teach their children about their emotions. I also have found in both my personal and clinical experience that this book can be helpful for grandparents and other caregivers of children. This book offers children and caregivers shared language to discuss feelings which can be helpful if children

Do you read this book with your kiddos? We totally do. A lot. What originally drew you to it? How do you see it impacting your littles? I would love to hear about your experience with this material. Please make sure to read over the Terms and Conditions when posting comments!

 

Supplemental Material: “The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*uck”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*uck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living the Good Life by Mark Manson

Type of Material: Self-Help Book on boundaries

How to Access it: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*uck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living the Good Life is available to purchase on Amazon as well as numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for any of my resources.

Publisher’s Synopsis: “There are only so many things we can give a f*ck about, so we need to figure out which ones really matter, Manson makes clear. While money is nice, caring about what you do with your life is better, because true wealth is about experience. A much-needed grab-you-by-the-shoulders-and-look-you-in-the-eye moment of real talk, filled with entertaining stories and profane, ruthless humor, The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is a refreshing slap for a generation to help them lead contented, grounded lives.”

How I learned about this resource: I was looking for a new resource to address having boundaries and was told about this book three times in one week by three different clinicians.

Why I suggest this resource: This book is honest, somewhat crass, and a good reminder to care deeply about things that matter to you, and create boundaries around or separation from those that don’t.

Who may benefit from this resource: Those who struggle setting boundaries in their life and find that they are prone to being pulled in different directions emotionally. Also, as someone who often finds herself battling with perfectionism, Manson reminds his readers that without struggle we do not grow and avoiding problems only create more problems. His willingness to say the hard things is refreshing.

If you’ve already read this book, what was impactful for you? I’d love to hear about it! If you want to share, please leave a comment below with your own experience. Remember to check the Terms and Conditions for guidelines on commenting.

Supplemental Material: “Daring Greatly”

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional with reading supplemental material outside of the therapy session. In my clinical work, I often suggest books, movies, video clips, and music to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles. I do not receive any benefits for sharing this supplemental material on my blog.

Title of Material: Daring Greatly: How the Courage to be Vulnerable Transforms the Way we Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brene Brown

Type of Material: Self-Help Book

How to Access it: Daring Greatly is available to purchase on Amazon as well as numerous book stores. I also suggest checking your local library for any of my resources.

Oftentimes therapy can be more effective when clients are intentional outside of the therapy session. In my work, I often suggest supplemental material to my clients that support their personal work, challenges them to think differently, and/or help them feel known and not alone. The resources discussed here are used regularly in my work and are helpful for a variety of struggles.

Publisher’s Synopsis: Daring Greatly is not about winning or losing. It’s about courage. In a world where “never enough” dominates and feeling afraid has become second nature, vulnerability is subversive. Uncomfortable. It’s even a little dangerous at times. And, without question, putting ourselves out there means there’s a far greater risk of getting criticized or feeling hurt. But when we step back and examine our lives, we will find that nothing is as uncomfortable, dangerous, and hurtful as standing on the outside of our lives looking in and wondering what it would be like if we had the courage to step into the arena—whether it’s a new relationship, an important meeting, the creative process, or a difficult family conversation. Daring Greatly is a practice and a powerful new vision for letting ourselves be seen.

How I learned about this resource: During a particularly raw part of my own life, someone shared Brene Brown’s original TED Talk with me. Since that moment, I have been impacted by her work and the power of her words on numerous occasions.

Why I suggest this resource: Brene Brown’s work has been so impactful, I believe, because we needed to hear it.

Who may benefit from this resource: Anyone can benefit from reading her work.

Have you read this book? If so, feel free to share how it impacted you in the comments!